The Life in My Years

An anthology of life

Friday Fotos is back! Back after the technical issue of a crashed photo editing program and my subsequent foot dragging on deciding on a new program.

This reboot celebrates a fixture that Cora and I saw almost everywhere we went in the beautiful state of Maine. It’s quintessential Maine. It’s a tool that can be used as a unique, colorful ornament and it symbolizes one of Maine’s most popular culinary contributions – lobster. It’s the lobsterman’s buoy.

The buoy is attached to a lobster trap or set of traps and marks the spot where a lobsterman has placed his traps. The distinctive colors and patterns of the buoy identify its owner. Each lobsterman’s buoy has his own distinct color pattern. Think of it as an aquatic version of a cattle brand. Not only must the buoy display a distinct color pattern but the owner’s fishing boat must also display the same color pattern. The color design can be displayed on the hull’s two sides.

To see lobster buoys in Maine you don’t have to go to the docks. Mainers use them as ornaments and you can see the buoys hanging out just about anywhere; at restaurants, storefronts, from trees, lampposts, mailbox posts and porches. I’ve even seen them made into birdhouses. And they make for colorful photo subjects!

I got the lowdown on lobsterman’s buoys from the website Lobster Anywhere. If you want to learn more follow the link to their article Lobster Buoys Mark the Spot.

IMG_1667

 

Bouys lamp

Bouys in tree

 

 

buoys on a lamp post

 

buoys on a lamp post close

 

 

Bouys in tree close up

 

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17 thoughts on “Friday Fotos: Buoys Will Be Buoys

  1. Peter Turnbull says:

    Separated by the same language.

    Is it Buoys will be BOYS or Boo-oys, Boo-ies ?
    Just wondering if the British pronunciation degenerated to b’oy. while your lot retained the original.
    Just a change from moaning about Brexit.
    Regards,Peter.

    1. Paulie says:

      According to a few dictionaries there seems to be some wiggle room as regards the pronunciation. Apparently both pronunciations are accepted. Without looking up the etymology of the word I couldn’t say if the original pronunciation was ˈbü-ē and the dictionary editors, after the wide usage of ˈbȯi, simply decided to punt and allow both. From Merriam-Webster:
      buoy noun
      \ ˈbü-ē , ˈbȯi \
      1 : FLOAT sense 2
      especially, nautical : a floating object moored to the bottom to mark a channel or something (such as a shoal) lying under the water

      You have Brexit – I have Trump. Which is worse?

  2. Really cool — I had no idea. Definitely need to drive up to Maine and see them for myself.

    1. Paulie says:

      Thank you for visiting my site and commenting. Yes they are very cool. The only thing that seems more prevalent is blueberry stands – and lobsters.

  3. One thing about buoy is that the pronunciation (boo-ee) in the USA doesn’t sound at like the way the word is spelled. But the same can be said about countless words. See ya!

    Neil Scheinin

    1. Paulie says:

      According to a few dictionaries there seems to be some wiggle room as regards the pronunciation. Apparently both pronunciations are accepted. Without looking up the etymology of the word I couldn’t say if the original pronunciation was ˈbü-ē and the dictionary editors, after the wide usage of ˈbȯi, simply decided to punt and allow both. From Merriam-Webster:
      buoy noun
      \ ˈbü-ē , ˈbȯi \
      1 : FLOAT sense 2
      especially, nautical : a floating object moored to the bottom to mark a channel or something (such as a shoal) lying under the water

  4. Eliza Waters says:

    And don’t forget all the buoy magnets, jewelry, lawn ornaments, etc. for sale along with the ubiquitous lobster paraphernalia. 😉

    1. Paulie says:

      We usually do get Christmas ornaments at our travel destinations and buoy tree ornament would have been a good idea. That didn’t happen this year due to the unfortunate circumstances of our trip. Next year maybe!

  5. myplaidheart says:

    In a million years I never would have known what those were! 🙂

    1. Paulie says:

      To be quite honest I wouldn’t have either but for the fact Fodor’s mentions them in one of their travel guides. Thank you for visiting.

    1. Paulie says:

      Thank you Luisa.

  6. Phoebe Chi says:

    Really enjoying your blog. It’s nice to meet you! 🙂

    1. Paulie says:

      Likewise nice to meet you. Thank you so much for visiting. I’m glad you enjoy my site.
      Ive visited your blog several times. Love it.

  7. Robert Smith says:

    Absolutely great pics. i love these

    1. Paulie says:

      Thank you Robert and thank you for visiting. Driving through Maine you see those buoys just about everywhere.

      1. Robert Smith says:

        You are welcome Paulie.

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